Date of Award

5-11-2004

Document Type

Thesis

First Advisor

Dr. Gordon Brubacher

Abstract

A fundamental question throughout history, both past history and unfolding history, is the question of whether oppression should be opposed and changes should be attempted through violence or nonviolence. Conventional wisdom usually assumes that violent means are more reliable, indeed that violent means are the only type of response that carries the potential for success against ruthless opponents or overwhelming odds. But is this truly the case? When reallife conflicts are researched and observed, it becomes clear that nonviolent power is often far more successful than violent power, even to the point of being applicable in a wider variety of conflict situations.

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