Title

Re-storying “progress” through familial curriculum making: Toward a husbandry of rooted lives

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2015

Abstract

When Wendell Berry was awarded the Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities in 2012, the highest honor conferred by the federal government for intellectual achievement in the field, Bittman (2012) wrote of him, “he is among our best-known, most-adored, most-prolific, and widely admired poets, essayists, novelists … and social critics, a writer of almost incomparable breadth. Did I mention that he is also a farmer, a philosopher, a teacher, an activist?” He continued with his characterization,

Wendell is controversial, unique, and not simplistic. You’re not going to see him on the Today show or in People magazine. He doesn’t speak in sound bites but in leisurely, often literary sentences that, while not at all difficult to understand, require actual concentration and thought, two functions that are sadly in short supply in popular culture. (Bittman, 2012)

Comments

Originally published as:

Fischer, S. (2015). Re-storying “progress” through familial curriculum making: Toward a husbandry of rooted lives. In P. L. Thomas, P. Carr, J. Gorlewski, & B. Porfilio (Eds.), Pedagogies of kindness and respect: On the lives and education of children. New York, NY: Peter Lang.

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