Title

Is it Time for Another Historiographical Revolution?

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2013

Abstract

In comparing the average scores for men and women on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT, since revised and renamed as the Scholastic Assessment Test), sex differences in demographic and educational variables that influence test performance are usually ignored. In this study of 69,284 high school seniors (12th graders) who took the SAT in November of 1990, self-reported background information was used to compute adjusted scores for men and for women. On the Verbal section, the difference in observed means was 4.68 points while the difference in adjusted means was 9.87 points. On the Mathematical section, the difference in observed means was 45.38 points but the difference in adjusted means was 33.76 points (a reduction of over 25%). In all comparisons, the mean was higher for men than for women. It is argued that adjusted means may provide more appropriate comparisons of the performance of men and women on the SAT depending on the type of comparison to be made.

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